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Nasa shares a mesmerising image of the Aurora Borealis at sunrise from the International Space Station

April 17, 2018 5:35 PM
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An astronaut living on the International Space Station (ISS) has posted a mesmerising image of auroras around Earth.

The beautiful image shows the eerie green hues of the aurora as the sun rises over the southern hemisphere of our planet.

After some minor photo-enhancement from the space agency, the image - which was initially posted on Instagram - was re-posted by Nasa.

'Sunrise crashes an aurora party over the southern hemisphere,' American astronaut Ricky Arnold captioned his out-of-this-world snap.

Nasa liked the photo so much it made the space agency's image of the day last week.

The Northern and Southern Lights are natural light spectacles triggered in our atmosphere that are also known as the 'Auroras'.

The displays light up when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere.

The Northern and Southern Lights are natural light spectacles triggered in our atmosphere that are also known as the 'Auroras'.

The displays light up when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere.

Usually the particles, sometimes referred to as a solar storm, are deflected by Earth’s magnetic field.

But during stronger storms they enter the atmosphere and collide with gas particles, including hydrogen and helium.

These collisions emit light. Auroral displays appear in many colours although pale green and pink are common.

Usually the particles, sometimes referred to as a solar storm, are deflected by Earth’s magnetic field.

But during stronger storms they enter the atmosphere and collide with gas particles, including hydrogen and helium.

These collisions emit light. Auroral displays appear in many colours although pale green and pink are common.

'The dancing lights of auroras provide spectacular views, but also capture the imagination of scientists who study incoming energy and particles from our Sun', Nasa said in a statement.

This is not the first time an ISS astronaut has taken an image of the auroras.

Famed astronaut Scott Kelly took a picture showing the Earth enclosed in a red hue in 2015.

At 250 miles (400 km) above Earth, the astronauts of the satellite lab see extraordinary things on a daily basis.

Mr Arnold has also posted images of Namibia, Australia and San Francisco, as well as selfies taken in minimal gravity.

He recently also posted an image of the SpaceX Dragon after being separated from a Falcon 9 rocket.

Source: dailymail.co.uk

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