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The Latest: New fissure spatters lava from Hawaii volcano

May 13, 2018 12:10 AM
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A new lava fissure has opened up on Hawaii's Big Island in the vicinity of a geothermal energy plant.

Ken Gadd, a first-time visitor from Dayton, Ohio, takes pictures of the entrance to Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. The park is closed due to the threat of an explosive volcanic eruption. Warnings that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could shoot boulders and ash out of its summit crater are prompting people to rethink their plans to visit the Big Island. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

The U.S. Geological Survey said minor lava spatter erupted from the new fissure Saturday morning, which brings the total number of fissures to 16.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports the fissure opened 1 mile (1.6 kilometer) northeast of the last fissure and east of the Puna Geothermal Venture plant.

Plant workers this week removed the 50,000 gallons of pentane stored at the site as a precaution.

Geologists warn that the Kilauea volcano could shoot out large boulders and ash out of its summit crater.

President Donald Trump on Friday declared a major disaster exists on the Big Island.

Hawaii tourism officials are hoping Kilauea's eruption won't deter travelers from visiting the state's largest island, even as geologists warn the volcano could soon shoot large boulders out of its summit.

Travel industry executives note most of the Big Island is free of eruption threats from Kilauea, which began spurting lava into a residential neighborhood last week.

George Szigeti, CEO of the Hawaii Tourism Authority says Kilauea is being monitored constantly and says the Big Island is "immense" and there are large parts that are unaffected by the volcano.

President Donald Trump on Friday declared a major disaster exists on the Big Island. The move will make federal financial assistance available to state and local governments as they repair roads, public parks, schools and water pipes damaged by the eruption.

Hannique Ruder, a 65-year-old resident living in the Leilani Estates subdivision, stands on the mound of hardened lava Friday, May 11, 2018, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the summit crater. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Hannique Ruder, a 65-year-old resident living in the Leilani Estates subdivision, walks past the mound of hardened lava while surveying the neighborhood Friday, May 11, 2018, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the summit crater. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Toxic gases rise from cracks in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the summit crater. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Source: dailymail.co.uk

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